Old town Farm Inn Frequently Asked Questions

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Q. Why do people stay  in a country inn or a bed and breakfast?Why do people stay  in a country inn or a bed and breakfast?

Q. What kind of people come to The Old Town Farm Inn?

Q. Do you have a dress code?

Q. Why can't I bring my children that are under seven?

Q. What do people do when they stay at The Inn?

Q. Do we need to make dinner reservations?

Q. How far in advance do we need to make room reservations?

Q. Can you hold a room for me if I'm not sure about my plans?

Q. Can we come for a tour of The Inn?

Q. What did you do before you bought The Inn?

Q. Why are all those bridges covered?

Q. Why do people stay  in a country inn or a bed and breakfast?

Bed and breakfasts and country inns thrive today in large part because they provide an atmosphere of warmth and coziness that traditional hotels simply can't match.

The Old Town Farm Inn like most B&Bs is owned by the innkeepers, the Hunters, who live on the premises. It's only natural to expect that innkeepers who live in their own inns will bring a different attitude to the job than someone who works a shift behind a hotel reception desk counting the minutes till he or she can go home to forget about the customers left behind.

At B&Bs, the "customers" really are treated as guests. At The Old Town Farm Inn we will gladly help you find the best restaurants in the area, point you to the most romantic or interesting spots. The best of everything in fact from mountain swimming holes to shopping and more.

Like Most B&Bs and inns, we generate a substantial portion of our income from repeat business. We do depend on word-of-mouth recommendations. With these factors in mind it's easy to understand why we go out of our way to make sure your stay provides some great memories.

Activities available near Vermont's Old Town Farm Inn include hiking, fishing, antiqueing bicycling, snowmobiling,  and skiing.

Q.What kind of people come to The Old Town Farm Inn?

A. In short, all kinds of people. Business men and women stay with us because they want a setting conducive to rest and relaxation. Families come up for the area recreation facilities. We see quite a few couples celebrating their anniversary, relatives visiting in the area, and a lot of honeymooners.

Q. Do you have a dress code?

A. Of course not, at least none beyond common sense. You are here to unwind and relax. Wear whatever you will feel most comfortable in.

Q. Why can't I bring my children that are under seven?

A. The adult population has yet to establish meaningful diplomatic relations with the under seven year old population. We have found (through trial and unfortunate error) that children under seven are just not ready to fully enjoy the bed and breakfast experience. Generally they tend to express their displeasure in a way that detracts from the experience of our other guests.

Q. What do people do when they stay at The Inn?

A. Well, we can't say what goes on behind closed doors, but most guests arrive mid afternoon or early evening and then relax in their rooms or in the common room in winter, or on the patios in the summer before dinner. After a leisurely meal, then may go for a walk or a drive some may hit the ice others browse our library and return to their room to read, relax or...like I said, we don't know what goes on behind closed doors!

Q. Do we need to make dinner reservations?

A. Since we run a fresh kitchen, and making sushi demands the freshest fish, we can only provide dinners with an advance reservation.  We cannot accommodate walk-ins or last minute reservations. So please take the time to review our menu and if it looks appealing to you reserve your dinner as soon as possible 

Q. How far in advance do we need to make room reservations?

A. Our Inn has only 8 guest rooms. If you want room reservations, especially for weekend or holiday periods such as Christmas, President's week or fall foliage season, you should reserve the room you want as soon as you can. For Presidents weekend its best to reserve before January.

Q. Can you hold a room for me if I'm not sure about my plans?

We only have 8 rooms at the inn. Therefore we can not "hold" a room without a deposit. The first person who places a deposit on a room gets the room. We have some who reserve rooms more than a year in advance. So, in short, you need to reserve a room before someone else does!

Q. Can we come for a tour of The Inn?

A. Well, kinda, sorta, probably. Stop by during the middle of the day and we'll be happy to show you around. We just can't show you any of our rooms that are occupied when you are here.   So we put together a gallery with pictures of the rooms. We hope you understand and we invite you to take a virtual tour right here.

Q. What did you do before you bought The Inn?

A. Michiko was an instructor of Interior Design, Environmental Design and Rendering and Presentation Technologies At Sage Junior College of Albany and a Lighting Designer in New York City. 

Aleks was an industrial designer designing commercial and monumental window systems and the CAD and database system engineer for engineering department. For the last year prior to purchasing the inn, Aleks worked as a project manager for a construction company in Manhattan. Aleks still does freelance AutoCAD programming, database integration, and commercial and monumental window system design.

Kuniko was a stellar first grade student.

Q. Why are all those bridges covered?

The number of stories people tell about why so many of our bridges are covered is amazing. Some are funnier than others, all make sense on the surface, until you think about if for a moment ot two. See if you can figure out which of the following is the correct reason for covering bridges.

  • People have speculated that the cover is to keep the snow off, so the steeper the better. Would you really want to cross a bridge that couldn't hold the weight of the snowload?

  • Others make the more fanciful supposition that the bridges were built to resemble barns. The reason for this was to make the horses comfortable. Obviously this theory did not come from a horse owner.

  • Still others maintain that in those agrarian days, everybody knew how to build a barn, so they didn't have any trouble building a bridge shaped like a barn. By extension everybody in today's computer age knows how to build a computer.

  • One rural legend that is more difficult to refute is that the builders covered the bridges to keep the taxpayers from seeing their slipshod workmanship under the camouflage of the wooden shell.

  • Still others insist that the bridges were designed for travelers caught in storms. People are friendly up here, and most hospitable, but if you have thoughts of holding up traffic through a bridge because its raining, the best advice is to think again.

Do you give up? We hope so, because all of the above reasons are wrong. The reality that wooden bridges were covered to protect the wooden trusses that gave the bridges their structural integrity. Much as a house is sheathed to protect the framework from the elements. If the trusses were left to mother nature's tender mercies, their life expectancy was about ten years. When people covered them, the spans' life span increased to over a century."